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We wish you a profitable Christmas

Introduction With Christmas fast approaching and black Friday/Cyber Monday having passed, retailers will be hoping for a big spike in sales this December to add some sparkle to another challenging year. The uncertain political environment both domestic and abroad has had a visible impact on consumer confidence and, coupled with rising prices and a weak pound, is adding to … Continue Reading

A Fight over the Runway II – Monarch Successful on Appeal

Following on from our previous blog A Fight Over the Runway – Monarch Administrators Lose High Court Battle, the latest development in the saga is the recent Court of Appeal decision in Monarch Airlines Ltd v Airport Coordination Ltd [2017] EWCA Civ 1892. Overturning the decision of the High Court, the Court of Appeal held that Monarch … Continue Reading

There’s Gold in Them Thar Employee Benefit Trusts … Fool’s Gold

EBTs – The Good Employee Benefit Trusts (“EBTs”) have become prevalent in recent years. They were originally devised as a form of discretionary trust to benefit employees and in most cases continue to be operated as a legitimate part of employee incentive plans, such as to house shares for distribution to employees. EBTs – The … Continue Reading

Know the rules! Further changes to IR 2016 afoot

UK insolvency law has seen a number of significant changes over recent years, including the introduction of the Insolvency Rules 2016 (“IR 2016”) in April 2017. Further legislation has been expected in order to ensure that all of these changes apply consistently throughout the whole insolvency regime, after it became clear that IR 2016 did … Continue Reading

A Fight Over the Runway – Monarch Administrators Lose High Court Battle

An out-of-hours office appointment of an administrator, although not unusual, is not a regular occurrence in the world of insolvency. It is however, exactly what happened at 4am on Monday 2 October, as Britain’s longest surviving airline brand ‘Monarch’ entered administration. The collapse of the airline comes as a result of mounting cost pressures in … Continue Reading

Taking flight: taxation on receivership

The recent case of Farnborough Airport Properties Company and another v HMRC is noteworthy for the light it shines on the dimly lit and often difficult interaction between tax law and insolvency. The issues The two companies operating Farnborough Airport (the host of ‘the largest industry event on the aerospace calendar’) were members of the … Continue Reading

LIBOR – living on borrowed time?

The FCA Chief Executive Andrew Bailey announced 0n 27 July 2017 that market participants should not rely on the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) being available long term. The announcement made it clear that the long-standing benchmark used both in the UK and the US is to be replaced. The speech presented by the FCA’s … Continue Reading

Blockchain: Buying a Property in 60 seconds…

In a recently published article, John Danahy, a real estate partner in Squire Patton Boggs’ London office, explores transactions of the future using cryptocurrencies, blockchains and “data vaults”containing both personal and property information.  Restructuring and insolvency professionals will need to keep up to date on these developments which will have an impact not only on … Continue Reading

Reporting the misconduct of companies, directors and bankrupts

There are various ways misconduct can be reported in respect of companies and individuals. Establishing which authority has the power to conduct investigations of wrongdoing depends to a certain extent on the status of the companies and individuals. The Insolvency Service is empowered by law as the proper authority to investigate transgressions such as serious corporate abuse and the conduct of … Continue Reading

Shining a light on the GDPR – is the insolvency profession prepared?

What is the GDPR? The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is an EU regulation designed to strengthen and harmonise data protection rules for processing data of all individuals within the EU and covers the transfer of such personal data outside the EU. One of the aims of the new legislation is to give control back to individuals … Continue Reading

UEFA’s Financial Fair Play Regulations: Neymar, Mbappe and PSG’s transfer policy – “Financial Doping” or Market Forces?

Paris Saint Germain’s summer transfer activity came to an end in (Seine)sational style! The facts speak for themselves: The two largest football transfer fees in history – £366M combined spending on Neymar da Silva Santos Junior and Kylian Mbappe; Combined wages of a reported £700k/week (both on 5 year contracts). The signings of Neymar and … Continue Reading

Employee Benefit Trusts and insolvency – the next big thing?

Remuneration schemes involving Employee Benefit Trusts (EBTs) have become more prevalent over the last 20 years, often as a way of seeking to remunerate key employees without making pay as you earn or national insurance contributions. Given the developments highlighted below, insolvency practitioners are advised to investigate such schemes in matters coming across their desks to see … Continue Reading

Second ranking charges – No assets, no charge?

The recent Court of Appeal decision in Saw (SW) 2010 Ltd and another v Wilson and others (as joint administrators of Property Edge Lettings Ltd) is the first case to address the effect of automatic crystallisation of an earlier floating charge upon a later floating charge. In order for a floating charge to be a … Continue Reading

Fight or Flight – Insolvency in the aviation industry

Air Berlin, one of Europe’s largest airlines, filed for insolvency on 15 August 2017. The airline, which is Germany’s second-largest carrier after Lufthansa, filed following the decision by Etihad Airways to pull financial support. Etihad owns 29% of Air Berlin and had been pumping money into the struggling airline for the past 6 years. The … Continue Reading

Blockchain: Banks Are Taking Back Control – Time for the Real Estate Industry to Do the Same?

In a recently published article, John Danahy, a real estate partner based in Squire Patton Boggs’ London office, explores the development of a new cryptocurrency and its impact on the worlds of finance and global real estate. Of particular relevance to restructuring and insolvency professionals is the use of so-called “blockchains” in title transfers and … Continue Reading

Mutual Recognition- It takes two…..

UK lawyers and restructuring professionals have been highlighting their concerns for British business and Financial Markets if the Government is unable to negotiate a bespoke treaty between the UK and the EU to preserve the mutual and reciprocal recognition provisions written into the Recast EU Insolvency Regulation (Recast EIR) and the Recast Brussels Regulation (the … Continue Reading

For whom the bell tolls! – Financial distress in the education sector

The new school year is upon us and once again the education sector (and particularly funding for institutions from primary school right through to further education) is in the spotlight at a time when growth continues to stagnate. Education providers are continuing to encounter financial risk as a result of increase in investment requirements outstripping growth. These factors coupled with … Continue Reading

“But, we had a deal!” – Office Holders and Personal Liability for Costs

The recent Court of Appeal case of Stevensdrake Limited v Stephen Hunt [2017] EWCA Civ 1173 provides guidance on whether the office holder is liable to meet the legal costs in CFA cases where there are insufficient recoveries in the estate to meet those costs. Central to costs assessments in litigation proceedings is what is … Continue Reading

Cross Border Insolvency Regulations 2006: Consideration of the public policy exemption and security for costs against Russian official receiver

In the recent case of Cherkasov & others v Olegovich [2017] EWHC 756 (Ch) the English courts considered the public policy exception set out in Article 6 Cross Border Insolvency Regulations 2006 (CBIR) and whether security for costs could be ordered against the official receiver of a Russian company (who had obtained recognition in England … Continue Reading
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