Tag Archives: Manchester

The High Court in London goes digital

As of 25 April 2017, for courts within the Chancery division of the High Court in London, the filing of all applications, forms and documents must be performed electronically. This includes the Bankruptcy and Companies Courts within Greater London. It does not apply to the High Courts outside London. Where once a lawyer might expect … Continue Reading

Tenant Troubles- A minefield for the receiver

Managing residential tenanted property can be a challenge for receivers. In many cases, it is necessary for them to act as “accidental landlords” to maximise the potential realisations to the appointing lender. These lenders have lent money to companies or individuals who invest in residential blocks and collect rents from their tenants. When the borrowers default, … Continue Reading

Cross Border Insolvency Regulations 2006- Lifting the automatic stay on proceedings in the English courts

The English Court has agreed to lift the automatic stay on proceedings under the Cross Border Insolvency Regulations 2006 (“CBIR”) against STX Offshore & Shipbuilding Co Ltd (“STX”) which had entered into rehabilitation proceedings in Korea. Facts STX had guaranteed to Ronelp Marine Limited and others (“Claimants”) the performance of a subsidiary (Dallan) in relation to … Continue Reading

Financial services and not-for-profit firms should consider new PPF proposals on insolvency risk scorecards

The Pension Protection Fund (PPF) is reviewing its insolvency risk model with Experian. The proposals being considered are particularly relevant to the financial services and charity sectors. It is proposed they be introduced from 2018/2019 (and will not be part of the draft levy rules and levy estimate for 2017/18, which we expect will contain few … Continue Reading

Why financiers should consider taking security over short leases

When we review security for financiers, we always consider what enhancements they might implement to strengthen their security net. As part of this approach, we obtain a proprietor search from the Land Registry to see if there is any uncharged property in the name of the borrower. Often, any property identified is a short to … Continue Reading

US and English Courts welcome most- but not all- foreign debtors

TMA’s Journal for Corporate Renewal July/August 2016 published an article written by Nava Hazan, Mark Salzberg and Susan Kelly, which discusses how the US Bankruptcy Courts have been open to foreign debtors, as well as the limits to such availability, which was the subject of the recent Baha Mar decision in Delaware. The article further … Continue Reading

When an Asset is not an Asset

The Court of Appeal has recently considered the status of contingent assets within the balance sheet test for insolvency in the context of a company’s inability to pay its debts. Under Section 123 Insolvency Act 1986, a company is deemed unable to pay its debts if its assets are less than its liabilities including contingent … Continue Reading

Tread CAREfully, mind the funding gap…….

The health and social care sector is currently facing its most significant challenge since the Southern Cross care-homes collapse in 2011. A financial crisis is on the horizon, resulting from the unwelcome trifecta of rising staff costs, significant funding cuts and a steadily increasing regulatory burden. In the five years since the Southern Cross collapse … Continue Reading

Regulators’ bite now as bad as bark

The director at the heart of the Carrington Wire pension fund deficit saga has been disqualified for a period of 12 years. Background We have previously reported on the background to the Carrington Wire Limited (“CWL”) collapse and the Pensions Regulator’s actions in issuing warning notices to CWL’s former Russian parent company (OAO Severstal), and … Continue Reading

Cherry picking from the global insolvency tree, the road to harmonisation

Complex multi-jurisdictional insolvencies are an inevitable consequence of the increasingly global nature of big business. The collapse of the likes of Barings, Enron and most recently Lehmans (the latter involving insolvency proceedings in some 16 jurisdictions) have highlighted the growing need for legislative action to promote cross-border co-operation and protect the interests of international creditors. … Continue Reading

Michael Cuda comments on energy lending on Bloomberg TV

On October 15,  Squire Patton Boggs Partner Michael Cuda was interviewed for a segment on Bloomberg TV’s “Markets” program where he discussed the price of oil and energy credit line redeterminations. Michael, based in the Dallas office, specializes in petroleum-industry turnarounds. He said Banks that lend money to energy companies are likely to slash credit … Continue Reading

Robin Hood’s Wrongful Deeds

The English High Court has, in one of the few successful cases on wrongful trading, clarified when directors ought to know that there is no reasonable prospect of avoiding insolvent liquidation and where the burden of proof lies in such cases. Background In Brookes v Armstrong (also known as Joint Liquidators of Robin Hood Centre … Continue Reading

English Court Considers How Much Connection is Sufficient?

The English High Court has again considered whether by itself the choice of English law and court jurisdiction in legal documentation establishes a “sufficient connection” with England to enable a foreign company to avail itself of an English scheme of arrangement. Background It has become increasingly popular for foreign companies to utilise an English scheme … Continue Reading

Walk this way? – The UK’s view of a European Insolvency Framework

In March 2014 the European Commission issued a Recommendation considering a new approach to business failure and insolvency, targeting efficient restructuring of viable enterprises in financial difficulty and a second chance for honest entrepreneurs. The objective of this Recommendation was: “to encourage Member States to put in place a framework that enables the efficient restructuring … Continue Reading

Lehman Brothers, the judicial gift that keeps on giving…..

Latest Lehman judgment reassures end users on Close-out Rights It is undeniable that the legal complexities, and unprecedented facts, of the long running Lehman Brothers saga have generated a wealth of legal principal, most notably through the Waterfall series of litigation. Against the background of administration, this trilogy (creatively named Waterfall I Application, Waterfall I Appeal and the upcoming Waterfall … Continue Reading
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